A Beginner’s Guide To Medical Play

Most of us engaged in some form of ‘doctors and nurses’ during childhood, and it can be just as much fun in the bedroom! Medical play explores the dynamics of pleasure and pain, and can include role-play, bondage, edge play, cock and ball torture, and more. Like wax play, no experience (or elaborate equipment) is necessary. So, let’s get stuck in!

What is Medical Play?

There are many facets to medical play; from tame kink to the more advanced levels. Some forms involve an intimate examination, wherein the dominant partner performs ‘medical’ procedures on the submissive patient. There are several medical devices and medical fetish toys that can be used during these sessions from a doctor’s stethoscope to medical restraints to penis plugs, and more. Medical play can also include erotic toys such as pumps, latex gear, and bondage. More intrusive procedures may involve the acting out of an anesthesia fetish, needle play, or the insertion of urethral sounds.

Safety First

As with most elements of BDSM, always discuss and pick a safeword and double check that you are both aware of the word and that when it is said the session is stopped completely.

Medical fetishes can incorporate various BDSM elements, so ensure you’ve read up on the technique beforehand and are both well-prepared. Communicate and take note of your partners’ reactions and tailor your games and techniques to that. Paying attention to your partner’s safety is paramount, so avoid anything that could impair your judgement, such as alcohol or drugs. The same goes for you partner – alcohol numbs the senses and could result in serious injuries.

If you’re session includes elements of Cock and Ball Torture (CBT), the dominant partner should keep an eye on circulation – increased pressure in the area due to squeezing or clamping can result in cutting off circulation completely. It is quite normal to experience a dull ache in the testicles post-session, but this should not last for a prolonged period of time. If the pain persists, you feel continually nauseous, or you notice any swelling or blood spots underneath the skin – seek medical attention immediately.

Electro play is also a common component of medical play. The biggest risk of electro-stimulation is passing a current through the heart, so ensure that the toy is turned off before making connections as you could inadvertently pass a current through the chest or head. Also remove all body jewelry and piercings, as it is likely to get hot and damage the skin. Don’t use any electro play devices if you are pregnant, epileptic, have any heart problems, or have a pacemaker fitted.

If the procedure you’re looking for has some complex, or skilled, elements – needle play, handling medical complex medical equipment, extreme breath play – you need to take the time to familiarise yourself with the tools and practice in a low-pressure situation beforehand. Learning to perform physical skills in a hot and sexy scene could make the difference between a good scene and a trip to A&E.

Types of Medical Play

The range of medical scenes appears limitless. We’ve already touched on a couple of medical play practices – although there is no exclusive list, here are some of the most common forms of medical play.

Less Intrusive Procedures

1. Examination – such as breast examination, penis examination, vaginal examination. Add latex gloves and a stethoscope for authenticity! Of course, these reality-based examinations can be expanded…

2. Gentle medical procedures – shaving and waxing, dental examinations, heart-rate and temperature procedures, and blood pressure diagnosis can all be done with medical equipment that can be purchased online or at a pharmacy.
More Intrusive Procedures

1. Enemas, Douches, and Prostate Massagers – there are a variety of devices to choose from that come in a variety of shapes and for different experience levels, so there’s something for everyone.

2. Speculums – a tool for investigating body orifices, they are the sin qua non of medical BDSM toys!

3. Catheters and Urine Bags – this requires medical knowledge and should be carried out with someone else in the room.

Although beginners can do most of the scenes mentioned above, medical play also encompasses edge play as well. Needle play is often done in the context of a medical scene. What better place to do needle play than in a “doctor’s office”? After all, it is clean and well stocked with antibacterial scrubs and washes. Note: needle play is a very advanced edge play and should not be attempted by a novice. Take the time to build your way up to more advanced scenarios – in the meantime, get comfortable and have fun!

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